Boys in beds? Here’s what happens when your boy gets too young to play, study

Boys in beds? Here’s what happens when your boy gets too young to play, study

A new study finds that young boys are more likely to get injured when they’re sitting on their beds.

The study is published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Researchers looked at injuries among 4,935 children ages 5 to 11 in six hospitals and compared injuries to other types of injuries and physical activities in those same hospitals.

They also looked at the hospital visits and injuries to the children by the time they were 16.

The most common type of injuries were broken bones, bruises, sprains and cuts, but they also included mild to moderate cuts and scratches.

About one in five boys were injured when a parent sat on a child, the study found.

The researchers didn’t say what kind of injuries occurred most often, but it’s likely a combination of falling, kicking or other activities.

The research found that when children sit on their own beds, they’re at increased risk of injuries, because the child is on his or her own and cannot protect himself or herself.

Some of the injuries may be caused by a broken bone, but the authors didn’t find a link between sitting on a broken bed and more severe injuries.

The boys who were sitting on the beds were also more likely than those sitting on other types to be more likely in those other injuries to suffer a traumatic brain injury or a skull fracture.

The authors said the most common injury was a fractured skull, and there were more serious injuries than those that weren’t severe.

Injuries to the brain and spinal cord were the most prevalent injuries in children who were on the bed, with a median of 14 serious injuries.

But it wasn’t clear whether children who sit on a bed that isn’t used by a parent also have the highest risk of injury, the researchers wrote.

“We found that children who sleep on their backs and those who sit face down had a higher risk of sustaining a head injury, whereas those who sleep face up were not,” said Dr. David M. Schofield, a professor of pediatric neurology and neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“This is an important finding that raises concerns that it’s a combination problem.

But more research is needed to determine if these patterns are universal or not.”

The researchers analyzed the injuries in a way that included the types of head injuries they described.

“Most commonly, the injuries were to the neck and/or skull, with neck fractures being the most frequent,” the authors wrote.

The findings come at a time when parents are increasingly asking whether children should be allowed to play in their own bedrooms.

In February, a California bill to allow children to play on their parents’ beds became law.

That same month, a Texas bill that would have expanded parental oversight of bedrooms in schools passed in the state Senate.

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